Standard cash statement of Yuki

Modified on Fri, 15 Sep 2023 at 11:32 AM

Disclaimer

All screenshots in the article were taken in the Dutch version of Yuki.


A cash statement is used if a company has a cash register where money regularly flows in and out. It is then very important for a correct administration that the cash is drawn up periodically (weekly or monthly). This involves looking at what cash sales and purchases there were, how much money was deposited to the bank or withdrawn from the bank and what other cash flows went in and out of the cash register. The balance of all,these cash flows must explain the gap between the cash balance of the previous count and the current balance.


It is in Yuki always possible to deactivate a petty cash.


Distinction of cash flows

When it comes to cash flows, we distinguish the following:

  • Cash disposals: Revenue that was sold via cash register(s).
  • Which part was paid with debit card or credit card (that part didn't end up as cash money in cash register)
  • Payment of invoices (that were sent before) by customers 
  • Cash expenses
  • Cash deposits at bank
  • Cash withdrawals from bank (for example change).

Standard cash statement of Yuki (Scan form 'Cash statement (PDF)')



Explanation of different parts of standard cash statement

When it comes to cash flows, we distinguish the following:

  • Cash disposals (Kasverkopen)
    In this box you enter the total of the cash disposals that is realised since the previous cash statement is processed. The revenue includes VAT. It is necessary for the VAT return that you split the revenue per VAT rate. So the total of the revenue whereof the highest VAT rate is charged must be separated of the revenue whereof the low VAT rate of no VAT at all is charged. Here you also have to enter the cash disposals that are paid with debit card or credit card separately.

    On the last line of this box you enter the total of all cash disposals ((as referred to above) that are paid by debit card or credit card. This is after all the part of the cash disposals whereof the proceeds won't end up in petty cash.

  • Payment of invoices by customers (Betalingen van klanten op facturen)
    if there are customers that have given cash money for the payment of sales invoices (sales that wasn't taken into account in the abovementioned box) then you enter them in this box. In order to write-off the invoices as paid it is necessary that the name of each customer is entered on a separate line. Possibly also the number of the invoice that is paid can be entered.

  • Cash expenses (Uit kas betaald)
    In this box you enter all cash expenses, per cash expenditure you enter the name of the supplier, type of expenditure, the VAT amount and the total amount of the expenses (including VAT). This is necessary for the VAT deduction. Keep the receipts yourself. It is important that you don't upload these receipts in Yuki. This could lead to duplicate processing. If you however want to save the receipts electronically in the archive then you can possibly create a folder wherein you can keep the receipts.

  • Other cash transactions (Overige kastransacties)
    In this box you specify:
    • the total of all cash deposits at the bank (amounts that you have taken to the bank and have been deposited into your corporate bank account).
    • the total of all cash withdrawals from the bank (amounts that you have withdrawn from your corporate bank account and have put in petty cash (for example: change).
    • the total of all amounts that you have withdrawn from petty cash for private purposes.
    • the total of all amounts that you have deposited into petty cash from private.

Calculation of cash difference

In order to calculate if your cash balance reconciles, you proceed as follows:

  • Take the  balance amount of the previous cash statement.
  • Add the amounts of all lines with a + behind them.
  • Subtract the amounts of the lines with a - after them.
  • Subtract the cash balance as you counted it.


The remaining gap is the cash difference. Is the difference negative then there is a cash surplus (more in petty cash than expected). Is the difference positive then there is a cash deficit (less in petty cash than expected). If the difference is significant then first check very well if you have included all the income and expenses.


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